2020 Essence of Humanities and Social Sciences39: Decision Making E 2

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Academic unit or major
Humanities and social science courses
Instructor(s)
Inohara Takehiro 
Course component(s)
Lecture
Mode of instruction
ZOOM
Day/Period(Room No.)
Wed1-2(Zoom)  
Group
2
Course number
LAH.S508
Credits
1
Academic year
2020
Offered quarter
4Q
Syllabus updated
2020/9/18
Lecture notes updated
-
Language used
English
Access Index

Course description and aims

[IMPORTANT]
(Information on 4Q Essence of Humanities and Social Sciences39: Updated July 28th, 2020)
Because this year's classes are offered live via Zoom, there will be some changes to assessment criteria and methods, etc.
Details will be announced, as soon as it is decided, to the registered students by OCW-i emails.
Zoom Meeting ID and password you need to attend the classes will also be notified by OCW-i emails, at least two days before the first class.
Please check regularly your emails and the announcements list for this course in OCW-i.

(Information on 2Q Essence of Humanities and Social Sciences39: Updated June 7th, 2020)
The content of this syllabus in 2020, especially how classes are conducted, how course materials are provided, and the method of evaluation, may be changed as a result of measures against Novel Coronavirus.

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The theme of this course is “social networks and decision making.” This course deals with fundamental concepts and analysis methods of social decision making on social networks through lectures, working on exercise problems, and group work. Specifically, this course treats the topics such as “stability of social networks,” “coalition formation in social networks,” “Social networks and social decision making,” “deadlock of meetings,” and “interaction consistency in selection and election groups.” These are fundamental concepts and analysis methods of social decision making on social networks, which the students are expected to understand upon the completion of this course.

Taking social decision making on social networks as an object, this course aims to cultivate the students’ abilities to: select an appropriate mathematical model for describing and analyzing an object; describe the object by a mathematical model; draw some insights from the results of analysis of the mathematical model; convey the analysis results to others concisely.

Student learning outcomes

Upon completion of this course, taking social decision making on social networks as an object, students should be able to:
1) State the definitions of mathematical models using examples of the objects described by the mathematical models;
2) Apply analysis methods to examples of the objects described by the mathematical models, and explain the analysis results to others;
3) Select an appropriate mathematical model and describe an object; and
4) Apply analysis methods to an object described by a mathematical model, and explain the analysis results to others.

Keywords

Stability of social networks; Coalition formation in social networks; Social networks and social decision making; Deadlock of meetings; Interaction consistency in selection and election groups

Competencies that will be developed

Specialist skills Intercultural skills Communication skills Critical thinking skills Practical and/or problem-solving skills

Class flow

One class deals with one topic.

A lecture on the topic is presented, and the students work on exercise problems, first individually, second in pairs, then in groups of four, and finally with the class as a whole. At the end of the class, each student writes and submits a "summary report" on what he/she learned through individual observation, other students' ideas, the lecture, and exercise problems.

Course schedule/Required learning

  Course schedule Required learning
Class 1 Guidance; Self introduction State at least three topics this course treats. Find at least three new colleagues.
Class 2 Notation; Social Networks; Stability; Symmetry Find an example of social networks which are of three decision makers and stable in Heider’s sense. Find an example of social networks which are of three decision makers and NOT stable in Heider’s sense.
Class 3 Separability; Clusterability; General clusterability Find an example of social networks which are of three decision makers, one of who is with negative self attitude, and stable in Newcomb’s sense. Find an example of social networks which are of three decision makers, one of who is with negative self attitude, and NOT stable in Newcomb’s sense.
Class 4 Group work on social decision making situations Describe and analyze social decision making situations through group work.
Class 5 Social decision making situations; Meetings; Selection groups; Election groups Find an example of social decision making situations with three decision makers.
Class 6 Interaction consistency; Majority decisiveness; Deadlock Find an example of meetings which are of three decision makers and at a deadlock. Find an example of meetings which are of three decision makers and NOT at a deadlock.
Class 7 Stability; Bisectability; Quasi-clusterability; Summary (1) Compare two distinct social networks of three decision makers by using the results of stability analysis with Heider’s stability and Newcomb’s stability. (2) Considering meetings, selection groups, and election groups with the two social networks in (1), compare the two social networks by using the results of analysis on deadlock of meetings and interaction consistency.

Out-of-Class Study Time (Preparation and Review)

To enhance effective learning, students are encouraged to spend approximately 100 minutes preparing for class and another 100 minutes reviewing class content afterwards (including assignments) for each class.
They should do so by referring to textbooks and other course material.

Textbook(s)

Not applicable.

Reference books, course materials, etc.

Course materials are posted on OCW-i and/or provided during the classes.

[Reference books and materials]
D. Cartwright, F. Harary, Structural balance: a generalization of Heider’s theory, Psychol. Rev. 63 (1956) 277-293.
J.A. Davis, Clustering and structural balance in graphs, Hum. Relations 20 (1967) 181-187.
F. Heider, Attitudes and cognitive organization, J. Psychol. 21 (1946) 107-112.
T. Inohara, S. Takahashi and B. Nakano, On conditions for a meeting not to reach a deadlock, Applied Mathematics and Computation, Vol.90, No.1, pp.1-9, March, 1998.
猪原健弘、「感情と認識-競争と社会の非合理戦略II」、勁草書房、2002年(1.2節、2.1節、2.2節、4章、5章、6.1節、6.3節)(ISBN-10: 4326502231、ISBN-13: 978-4326502233)。
T. Inohara, Characterization of clusterability of signed graph in terms of Newcomb’s balance of sentiments, Applied Mathematics and Computation, Vol.133, No.1, pp.93-104, November, 2002.
T. Inohara, Clusterability of groups and information exchange in group decision making with approval voting system, Applied Mathematics and Computation, Vol.136, No.1, pp.1-15, March, 2003.
T. Inohara, Stability of reliance of information sources and clusterability of information sources, The 7th World Multi-Conference on Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics (SCI 2003), Proceedings Volume VII, pp.225-229, Orlando, Florida, USA, July 27-30, 2003.
T. Inohara, Quasi-clusterability of signed graphs with negative self evaluation, Applied Mathematics and Computation, Vol.158, No.1, pp.201-215, October, 2004.
T. Inohara, Signed graphs with negative self evaluation and clusterability of graphs, Applied Mathematics and Computation, Vol.158, No.2, pp.477-487, November, 2004.
T. M. Newcomb, Interpersonal balance, in: R.P. Abelson, E. Aronson, W.J. McGuire, T. M. Newcomb, M.J. Rosenberg, P.H. Tannenbaum (Eds.), Theories of Cognitive Consistency: A Sourcebook, Rand-McNally, Chicago, IL, 1968.
K.O. Price, E. Harburg, T.M. Newcomb, Psychological balance in situations of negative interpersonal attitudes, J. Pers. Soc. Psychol. 3 (1966) 265–270.
T. Inohara, "Rationality and Flexibility," Keiso-syobo, 2002 (in Japanese) (ISBN-10: 4326502223, ISBN-13: 978-4326502226).
T. Inohara, On conditions for a meeting not to reach a recurrent argument, Applied Mathematics and Computation, Vol.101, No.2-3, pp.281-298, June, 1999.

Assessment criteria and methods

Assessment will be based on "summary reports" written during each class (50% in total) and the final report (50%).

If you are absent from a class, regardless of the reason, points are subtracted from the evaluation portion of the "summary reports."
There are no make-up assignments.
Read the course materials posted on OCW-i to find out the content of the class you missed.

Details of the requirements of the two reports will be explained in the first class meeting.

Related courses

  • SHS.M461 : Graduate Methodologies in Cognition, Mathematics and Information S1
  • LAH.T108 : Decision Making A
  • LAH.T208 : Decision Making B
  • LAH.T307 : Decision Making C
  • LAH.S440 : Essence of Humanities and Social Sciences47: Decision Making D

Prerequisites (i.e., required knowledge, skills, courses, etc.)

Prospective students should have interests in social networks and decision making.

Contact information (e-mail and phone)    Notice : Please replace from "[at]" to "@"(half-width character).

Prof. Takehiro Inohara, inostaff[at]shs.ens.titech.ac.jp

- - - - -
[IMPORTANT]
(Information on 4Q Essence of Humanities and Social Sciences39: Updated July 28th, 2020)
Because this year's classes are offered live via Zoom, there will be some changes to assessment criteria and methods, etc.
Details will be announced, as soon as it is decided, to the registered students by OCW-i emails.
Zoom Meeting ID and password you need to attend the classes will also be notified by OCW-i emails, at least two days before the first class.
Please check regularly your emails and the announcements list for this course in OCW-i.

(Information on 2Q Essence of Humanities and Social Sciences39: Updated June 7th, 2020)
The content of this syllabus in 2020, especially how classes are conducted, how course materials are provided, and the method of evaluation, may be changed as a result of measures against Novel Coronavirus.

Other

This course consists of the content of science.

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