2017 Cell Physiology

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Academic unit or major
Graduate major in Life Science and Technology
Instructor(s)
Komada Masayuki  Tachibana Kazunori  Nakamura Nobuhiro  Nakatogawa Hitoshi 
Course component(s)
Lecture
Day/Period(Room No.)
Tue3-4(J221,S223)  Fri3-4(J221,S223)  
Group
-
Course number
LST.A404
Credits
2
Academic year
2017
Offered quarter
2Q
Syllabus updated
2017/3/21
Lecture notes updated
-
Language used
English
Access Index

Course description and aims

The cytoplasm is a place where cells transduce signals to respond to various extracellular stimuli such as growth factors and hormones. It is also a place where a variety of organelles play their roles. The organelles do not work independently but they continuously interact with one another by transporting various molecules. The cytoskeleton is essentially involved in the transport of molecules, as well as in higher cellular events such as cell migration and apoptosis. This course will provide a comprehensive overview of signal transduction, organella functions, and cytoskeleton. Molecular fundamentals as well as physiological and pathological aspects will be discussed.

This course aims to provide universal view and insights into the cellular structure and function.

Student learning outcomes

By the end of this course, students will be able to:
1. Discuss individual cellular events with a universal view on the total cellular system.

Keywords

Signal transduction, organelle, proteolysis, membrane traffic, cytoskeleton

Competencies that will be developed

Intercultural skills Communication skills Specialist skills Critical thinking skills Practical and/or problem-solving skills
- - -

Class flow

In the first 10 min of each lecture, a summary of the previous lecture is given as necessary, followed by the main points of the day's lecture. In the last 15 min of each lecture, a quiz may be given to find out students' understandings.

Course schedule/Required learning

  Course schedule Required learning
Class 1 Signal transduction (1) receptor tyrosine kinase Students must be able to explain the major signal transduction pathways by which growth factor-activated receptor tyrosine kinases induce cellular responses.
Class 2 Signal transduction (2) TGF-beta, cytokine, Wnt, TNF-alpha Students must be able to explain the signal transduction pathways by which TGF-beta, various cytokines, Wnt, and TNF-alpha induce cellular responses through their receptors.
Class 3 Signal transduction (3) receptor downregulation Students must be able to explain the molecular mechanisms of receptor down regulation.
Class 4 Signal transduction (4) G-protein-coupled receptor Students must be able to explain the signal transduction pathways by which various ligands induce cellular responses via G-protein-coupled receptors.
Class 5 Overview of organelles in eukaryotic cells Students must be able to explain the functions of all the organelles in eukaryotic cells.
Class 6 Ribosome, protein folding, proteasome Students must be able to explain how proteins are synthesized, how newly-synthesized proteins are folded, and how misfolded proteins are degraded in eukaryotic cells.
Class 7 Mitochondria Students must be able to explain the major functions of mitochondria.
Class 8 Apoptosis Students must be able to explain the molecular mechanisms by which apoptosis is induced in response to extracellular stimuli such as TNF-alpha or intracellular dysfunction such as DNA damage.
Class 9 Secretory pathway, membrane fusion Students must be able to explain the process by which newly-synthesized secretory proteins are transported to the extracellular space and the mechanisms of membrane fusion used in the process.
Class 10 Endocytosis Students must be able to explain the process by which specific extracellular molecules and plasma membrane proteins are incorporated into the cell.
Class 11 Traffic of lysosomal enzymes Students must be able to explain the process by which newly-synthesized lysosomal proteins are diverged from the secretory pathway and transported to the lysosome.
Class 12 Autophagy Students must be able to explain the roles and molecular mechanisms of autophagy, which delivers cytoplasmic proteins, organelles, and cytoplasmic pathogens to the lysosome.
Class 13 Actin filament and cell motility Students must be able to explain the major functions of actin filaments as well as the cell motility.
Class 14 Microtubule and vesicular traffic Students must be able to explain the major functions of microtuble as well as the vesicular traffic.
Class 15 Cytoskeleton and diseases Students must be able to explain the pathogenetic basis of cytoskeletal defects such as Alzheimer's disease.

Textbook(s)

Not specified.

Reference books, course materials, etc.

Reference books: Molecular Biology of the Cell (Alberts et al., Garland Science), Molecular Cell Biology (Rodish et al., W H Freeman & Co). Handouts will be distributed at the beginning of class when necessary.

Assessment criteria and methods

Mid-term and term-end reports

Related courses

  • Molecular and Cellular Biology Molecular and Cellular Biology Molecular and Cellular Biology Molecular and Cell ular Biology

Prerequisites (i.e., required knowledge, skills, courses, etc.)

None.

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